Tezuka in English was one of my very first exposures to Tezuka online, I'm so happy to see you have a tumblr blog now! I love this place.

That’s really great to hear. Look for some improvements to the website soon, a resurgence of the tumblr, and you can even follow us on Twitter @tezukainenglish ;)

Gao from the Chapter of “Hō-ō” (also known as “Karma”), from Osamu Tezuka’s masterpiece Phoenix (1967-88). ‘Nuff said.

Gao from the Chapter of “Hō-ō” (also known as “Karma”), from Osamu Tezuka’s masterpiece Phoenix (1967-88). ‘Nuff said.

"Ben! You’re safe… I’m so happy!"
Nothing like a boy being reunited with his dog… especially when the dog has been granted magical powers after drinking some holy water in an underground shrine.  This happy moment brought to you by Tezuka’s Flying Ben (1966-67).

"Ben! You’re safe… I’m so happy!"

Nothing like a boy being reunited with his dog… especially when the dog has been granted magical powers after drinking some holy water in an underground shrine.  This happy moment brought to you by Tezuka’s Flying Ben (1966-67).

Captain Ken, the mysterious “Savior of the Martians”, and the fast draw on all of Mars, takes down the hired gunman, Lamp.
Who is this mysterious human hero who intervenes to stem the tide of growing violence between humans and martians… and why does he always disappear whenever the lovely young woman Kenn Minakami is around?
All the answers can be found in Osamu Tezuka’s cowboys n’ martians epic, Captain Ken (1960-61).

Captain Ken, the mysterious “Savior of the Martians”, and the fast draw on all of Mars, takes down the hired gunman, Lamp.

Who is this mysterious human hero who intervenes to stem the tide of growing violence between humans and martians… and why does he always disappear whenever the lovely young woman Kenn Minakami is around?

All the answers can be found in Osamu Tezuka’s cowboys n’ martians epic, Captain Ken (1960-61).

 Jinnai is a student studying for university entrance exams. One day a beautiful young girl, dressed in rags and speaking a strange language shows up at his apartment.Jinnai soon discovers the girl is in fact a “spirit of the lamp”, who magically escaped a coup d’etat in an Arabian country over 2,000 years ago and, crossing the mists of time, has now appeared in modern-day Japan.In an attempt to thwart an assassination attempt, the girl genie has concealed the mysterious Princess Lumpenela in the lamp, but the sword-wielding assassins soon follow the trail to the present and Jinnai is quickly caught up in a magical adventure to keep Lumpenela safe.One of Tezuka’s most sexually suggestive gag-adventure tales, Beggar Princess Lumpenela (1980) features such over-the-top events as a pair of assassins having to navigate their way through some enormous female genitalia, and a missile that is suddenly grounded after developing a giant pair of testicles.Yep, it’s true.

 Jinnai is a student studying for university entrance exams. One day a beautiful young girl, dressed in rags and speaking a strange language shows up at his apartment.

Jinnai soon discovers the girl is in fact a “spirit of the lamp”, who magically escaped a coup d’etat in an Arabian country over 2,000 years ago and, crossing the mists of time, has now appeared in modern-day Japan.

In an attempt to thwart an assassination attempt, the girl genie has concealed the mysterious Princess Lumpenela in the lamp, but the sword-wielding assassins soon follow the trail to the present and Jinnai is quickly caught up in a magical adventure to keep Lumpenela safe.

One of Tezuka’s most sexually suggestive gag-adventure tales, Beggar Princess Lumpenela (1980) features such over-the-top events as a pair of assassins having to navigate their way through some enormous female genitalia, and a missile that is suddenly grounded after developing a giant pair of testicles.

Yep, it’s true.

Escaping from a gang of criminals, two young orphans, Minoru and Marimo stumble into the laboratory of a scientist who has created a transporter machine that can take the pair anywhere they wish.  With that, the pair are literally “broadcast” into one adventure after another - including a world inhabited by humanoid ants, a world filled with invisible men bent on world domination, and the American “Old West”.
All of the action takes place in Osamu Tezuka’s Adventure Broadcasting Station (1961).

Escaping from a gang of criminals, two young orphans, Minoru and Marimo stumble into the laboratory of a scientist who has created a transporter machine that can take the pair anywhere they wish.  With that, the pair are literally “broadcast” into one adventure after another - including a world inhabited by humanoid ants, a world filled with invisible men bent on world domination, and the American “Old West”.

All of the action takes place in Osamu Tezuka’s Adventure Broadcasting Station (1961).

Meet Kenta. Boy Detective.
Starring the power team-up of Shunsaku Ban as Dr. Thrill and Rock Holmes as his son Kenta, Tezuka’s mystery detective series, Dr. Thrill (1959) certainly lived up to its billing when it began serialization in the very first edition of Weekly Shonen Sunday (週刊少年サンデー).
Assassination plots, drug smugglers dressed up as giant insects, international conspirators, this one’s got it all.

Meet Kenta. Boy Detective.

Starring the power team-up of Shunsaku Ban as Dr. Thrill and Rock Holmes as his son Kenta, Tezuka’s mystery detective series, Dr. Thrill (1959) certainly lived up to its billing when it began serialization in the very first edition of Weekly Shonen Sunday (週刊少年サンデー).

Assassination plots, drug smugglers dressed up as giant insects, international conspirators, this one’s got it all.

“W-what is this…?!”
Siddhartha finds out that a soul can be a tricky thing to hold on to. This existential adventure comes courtesy of Buddha (1972-83), Osamu Tezuka’s fictionalized biography of Siddhartha Gautama.
Interesting to note, Buddha (1972-83) was published by Ushio Shuppan, who originally wanted to take over publication of Phoenix (1967-88) after it was left homeless with the demise of COM in 1972.  A masterful epic, eleven years in the making… not bad of a “consolation prize”. ;)
“W-what is this…?!”

Siddhartha finds out that a soul can be a tricky thing to hold on to. This existential adventure comes courtesy of Buddha (1972-83), Osamu Tezuka’s fictionalized biography of Siddhartha Gautama.

Interesting to note, Buddha (1972-83) was published by Ushio Shuppan, who originally wanted to take over publication of Phoenix (1967-88) after it was left homeless with the demise of COM in 1972.  A masterful epic, eleven years in the making… not bad of a “consolation prize”. ;)

"Garon, Kenichi, help meeeeee!"
Pick and Garon succeed in getting a volcano to erupt and blow up Kairyu-O Island, but are caught in the ensuing whirlpool.  The action comes from Tezuka’s tale of the giant alien robot with (quite literally) the heart of a young boy, The Devil Garon (1959-62).

"Garon, Kenichi, help meeeeee!"

Pick and Garon succeed in getting a volcano to erupt and blow up Kairyu-O Island, but are caught in the ensuing whirlpool.  The action comes from Tezuka’s tale of the giant alien robot with (quite literally) the heart of a young boy, The Devil Garon (1959-62).

More innovative panel design by Osamu Tezuka, this time, courtesy of his samurai epic General Onimaru (1969).
The son of a Roman soldier and a Japanese mother, Onimaru was hated and feared as a monster (or Oni) by the local village people because of his blue eyes and blond hair.  Captured and tortured, Onimaru escapes with the help of the legendary swordsman, Kojiro Soma and his flashing blade…
Hint: tilt your head to the right. ;)

More innovative panel design by Osamu Tezuka, this time, courtesy of his samurai epic General Onimaru (1969).

The son of a Roman soldier and a Japanese mother, Onimaru was hated and feared as a monster (or Oni) by the local village people because of his blue eyes and blond hair.  Captured and tortured, Onimaru escapes with the help of the legendary swordsman, Kojiro Soma and his flashing blade…

Hint: tilt your head to the right. ;)